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A million march to US Capitol to protest against ‘Obama the socialist’

September 14, 2009

A million march to US Capitol to protest against ‘Obama the socialist’
By DAVID GARDNER
Last updated at 6:59 AM on 14th September 2009
Comments (279)
Add to My Stories
As many as one million people flooded into Washington for a massive rally organised by conservatives claiming that President Obama is driving America towards socialism.
The size of the crowd – by far the biggest protest since the president took office in January – shocked the White House.
Demonstrators massed outside Capitol Hill after marching down Pennsylvania Avenue waving placards and chanting ‘Enough, enough’.
Tens of thousands of people converged on Capitol Hill on Saturday to protest against government spending
The focus of much of the anger was the president’s so-called ‘Obamacare’ plan to overhaul the U.S. health system.
Demonstrators waved U.S. flags and held signs reading ‘Go Green Recycle Congress’ and ‘I’m Not Your ATM’.’
The protest on Saturday came as Mr Obama took his campaign for health reforms on the road, making his argument to a rally of 15,000 supporters in Minneapolis.
Saying he was determined to push through a bill making health insurance more affordable, Mr Obama said: ‘I intend to be president for a while and once this bill passes, I own it.
‘I will not waste time with those who think that it’s just good politics to kill healthcare.’
But in Washington, protester Richard Brigle, 57, a Vietnam veteran, said: ‘It’s going to cost too much money we don’t have.’ Another marcher shouted: ‘You want socialism? Go to Russia!’
Terri Hall, 45, of Florida, said she felt compelled to become political for the first time this year because she was upset by government spending.
‘Our government has lost sight of the powers they were granted,’ she said. She added that the deficit spending was out of control, and said she thought it was putting the country at risk.
Anna Hayes, 58, a nurse from Fairfax County, stood on the Mall in 1981 for Reagan’s inauguration. ‘The same people were celebrating freedom,’ she said. ‘The president was fighting for the people then. I remember those years very well and fondly.’
Saying she was worried about ‘Obamacare,’Hayes explained: ‘This is the first rally I’ve been to that demonstrates against something, the first in my life. I just couldn’t stay home anymore.’
Andrew Moylan, of the National Taxpayers Union, received a roar of approval after he told protesters: ‘Hell hath no fury like a taxpayer ignored.’
Republican lawmakers also supported the rally.
‘Republicans, Democrats and independents are stepping up and demanding we put our fiscal house in order,’ Rep. Mike Pence, chairman of the House Republican Conference, said.
‘I think the overriding message after years of borrowing, spending and bailouts is enough is enough.’
FreedomWorks Foundation, a conservative organization led by former House of Representatives Majority Leader Dick Armey, organized several groups from across the country for what they billed as a ‘March on Washington.’
Organisers said they had built on momentum from the April ‘tea party’ demonstrations held nationwide to protest at Mr Obama’s taxation policies, along with growing resentment over his economic stimulus packages and bank bailouts.
The heated demonstrations were organized by a Conservative group called the Tea Party Patriots
Other sponsors of the rally include the Heartland Institute, Americans for Tax Reform and the Ayn Rand Center for Individuals Rights.
Recent polls illustrate how difficult recent weeks have been for a president who, besides tackling health care, has been battling to end a devastatingly deep recession.
Fifty per cent approve and 49 per cent disapprove of the overall job he is doing as president, compared to July, when those approving his performance clearly outnumbered those who were unhappy with it, 55 per cent to 42 per cent.
Just 42 percent approve of the president’s work on the high-profile health issue.
‘Parasite-in-chief’: The title given to the American President during the demonstrations on Saturday
The poll was taken over five days just before Obama’s speech to Congress. That speech reflected Obama’s determination to push ahead despite growing obstacles.
Prior to Obama’s speech before Congress U.S. Capitol Police arrested a man they say tried to get into a secure area near the Capitol with a gun in his car as President Barack Obama was speaking.
On Thursday police spokeswoman Kimberly Schneider said that 28-year-old Joshua Bowman of suburban Falls Church, Virginia, was arrested around 8pm on Wednesday when Obama was due to speak.

A million march to US Capitol to protest against ‘Obama the socialist’

By DAVID GARDNER

Last updated at 6:59 AM on 14th September 2009


Read entire article here

A million march to US Capitol to protest against ‘Obama the socialist’

By DAVID GARDNER

Last updated at 6:59 AM on 14th September 2009

Comments (279)

Add to My Stories

As many as one million people flooded into Washington for a massive rally organised by conservatives claiming that President Obama is driving America towards socialism.

The size of the crowd – by far the biggest protest since the president took office in January – shocked the White House.

Demonstrators massed outside Capitol Hill after marching down Pennsylvania Avenue waving placards and chanting ‘Enough, enough’.

Tens of thousands of people converged on Capitol Hill on Saturday to protest against government spending

The focus of much of the anger was the president’s so-called ‘Obamacare’ plan to overhaul the U.S. health system.

Demonstrators waved U.S. flags and held signs reading ‘Go Green Recycle Congress’ and ‘I’m Not Your ATM’.’

The protest on Saturday came as Mr Obama took his campaign for health reforms on the road, making his argument to a rally of 15,000 supporters in Minneapolis.

Saying he was determined to push through a bill making health insurance more affordable, Mr Obama said: ‘I intend to be president for a while and once this bill passes, I own it.

‘I will not waste time with those who think that it’s just good politics to kill healthcare.’

But in Washington, protester Richard Brigle, 57, a Vietnam veteran, said: ‘It’s going to cost too much money we don’t have.’ Another marcher shouted: ‘You want socialism? Go to Russia!’

Terri Hall, 45, of Florida, said she felt compelled to become political for the first time this year because she was upset by government spending.

‘Our government has lost sight of the powers they were granted,’ she said. She added that the deficit spending was out of control, and said she thought it was putting the country at risk.

Anna Hayes, 58, a nurse from Fairfax County, stood on the Mall in 1981 for Reagan’s inauguration. ‘The same people were celebrating freedom,’ she said. ‘The president was fighting for the people then. I remember those years very well and fondly.’

Saying she was worried about ‘Obamacare,’Hayes explained: ‘This is the first rally I’ve been to that demonstrates against something, the first in my life. I just couldn’t stay home anymore.’

Andrew Moylan, of the National Taxpayers Union, received a roar of approval after he told protesters: ‘Hell hath no fury like a taxpayer ignored.’

Republican lawmakers also supported the rally.

‘Republicans, Democrats and independents are stepping up and demanding we put our fiscal house in order,’ Rep. Mike Pence, chairman of the House Republican Conference, said.

‘I think the overriding message after years of borrowing, spending and bailouts is enough is enough.’

FreedomWorks Foundation, a conservative organization led by former House of Representatives Majority Leader Dick Armey, organized several groups from across the country for what they billed as a ‘March on Washington.’

Organisers said they had built on momentum from the April ‘tea party’ demonstrations held nationwide to protest at Mr Obama’s taxation policies, along with growing resentment over his economic stimulus packages and bank bailouts.

The heated demonstrations were organized by a Conservative group called the Tea Party Patriots

Other sponsors of the rally include the Heartland Institute, Americans for Tax Reform and the Ayn Rand Center for Individuals Rights.

Recent polls illustrate how difficult recent weeks have been for a president who, besides tackling health care, has been battling to end a devastatingly deep recession.

Fifty per cent approve and 49 per cent disapprove of the overall job he is doing as president, compared to July, when those approving his performance clearly outnumbered those who were unhappy with it, 55 per cent to 42 per cent.

Just 42 percent approve of the president’s work on the high-profile health issue.

‘Parasite-in-chief’: The title given to the American President during the demonstrations on Saturday

The poll was taken over five days just before Obama’s speech to Congress. That speech reflected Obama’s determination to push ahead despite growing obstacles.

Prior to Obama’s speech before Congress U.S. Capitol Police arrested a man they say tried to get into a secure area near the Capitol with a gun in his car as President Barack Obama was speaking.

On Thursday police spokeswoman Kimberly Schneider said that 28-year-old Joshua Bowman of suburban Falls Church, Virginia, was arrested around 8pm on Wednesday when Obama was due to speak.

As many as one million people flooded into Washington for a massive rally organised by conservatives claiming that President Obama is driving America towards socialism.

The size of the crowd – by far the biggest protest since the president took office in January – shocked the White House.

Demonstrators massed outside Capitol Hill after marching down Pennsylvania Avenue waving placards and chanting ‘Enough, enough’.

Tens of thousands of people converged on Capitol Hill on Saturday to protest against government spending

The focus of much of the anger was the president’s so-called ‘Obamacare’ plan to overhaul the U.S. health system.

Demonstrators waved U.S. flags and held signs reading ‘Go Green Recycle Congress’ and ‘I’m Not Your ATM’.’

The protest on Saturday came as Mr Obama took his campaign for health reforms on the road, making his argument to a rally of 15,000 supporters in Minneapolis.

Saying he was determined to push through a bill making health insurance more affordable, Mr Obama said: ‘I intend to be president for a while and once this bill passes, I own it.


‘I will not waste time with those who think that it’s just good politics to kill healthcare.’

But in Washington, protester Richard Brigle, 57, a Vietnam veteran, said: ‘It’s going to cost too much money we don’t have.’ Another marcher shouted: ‘You want socialism? Go to Russia!’

Terri Hall, 45, of Florida, said she felt compelled to become political for the first time this year because she was upset by government spending.

‘Our government has lost sight of the powers they were granted,’ she said. She added that the deficit spending was out of control, and said she thought it was putting the country at risk.

Anna Hayes, 58, a nurse from Fairfax County, stood on the Mall in 1981 for Reagan’s inauguration. ‘The same people were celebrating freedom,’ she said. ‘The president was fighting for the people then. I remember those years very well and fondly.’

Saying she was worried about ‘Obamacare,’Hayes explained: ‘This is the first rally I’ve been to that demonstrates against something, the first in my life. I just couldn’t stay home anymore.’

Andrew Moylan, of the National Taxpayers Union, received a roar of approval after he told protesters: ‘Hell hath no fury like a taxpayer ignored.’

Republican lawmakers also supported the rally.

‘Republicans, Democrats and independents are stepping up and demanding we put our fiscal house in order,’ Rep. Mike Pence, chairman of the House Republican Conference, said.

‘I think the overriding message after years of borrowing, spending and bailouts is enough is enough.’

FreedomWorks Foundation, a conservative organization led by former House of Representatives Majority Leader Dick Armey, organized several groups from across the country for what they billed as a ‘March on Washington.’

Organisers said they had built on momentum from the April ‘tea party’ demonstrations held nationwide to protest at Mr Obama’s taxation policies, along with growing resentment over his economic stimulus packages and bank bailouts.




The heated demonstrations were organized by a Conservative group called the Tea Party Patriots

Other sponsors of the rally include the Heartland Institute, Americans for Tax Reform and the Ayn Rand Center for Individuals Rights.

Recent polls illustrate how difficult recent weeks have been for a president who, besides tackling health care, has been battling to end a devastatingly deep recession.

Fifty per cent approve and 49 per cent disapprove of the overall job he is doing as president, compared to July, when those approving his performance clearly outnumbered those who were unhappy with it, 55 per cent to 42 per cent.

Just 42 percent approve of the president’s work on the high-profile health issue.


‘Parasite-in-chief’: The title given to the American President during the demonstrations on Saturday

The poll was taken over five days just before Obama’s speech to Congress. That speech reflected Obama’s determination to push ahead despite growing obstacles.

Prior to Obama’s speech before Congress U.S. Capitol Police arrested a man they say tried to get into a secure area near the Capitol with a gun in his car as President Barack Obama was speaking.

On Thursday police spokeswoman Kimberly Schneider said that 28-year-old Joshua Bowman of suburban Falls Church, Virginia, was arrested around 8pm on Wednesday when Obama was due to speak.

Read entire article here

‘Doctors told me it was against the rules to save my premature baby’

September 9, 2009

By VANESSA ALLEN and ANDREW LEVY
Last updated at 7:58 AM on 09th September 2009

Read The Article Here

Doctors left a premature baby to die because he was born two days too early, his devastated mother claimed yesterday.

Sarah Capewell begged them to save her tiny son, who was born just 21 weeks and five days into her pregnancy – almost four months early.

They ignored her pleas and allegedly told her they were following national guidelines that babies born before 22 weeks should not be given medical treatment.

Enlarge Sarah Capewell, mother of Jayden Capewell

Battle: Sarah Capewell is fighting to have guidelines about caring for very premature babies changed

Miss Capewell, 23, said doctors refused to even see her son Jayden, who lived for almost two hours without any medical support.

She said he was breathing unaided, had a strong heartbeat and was even moving his arms and legs, but medics refused to admit him to a special care baby unit.

Miss Capewell is now fighting for a review of the medical guidelines.

Sarah Capewell and her daughter Jodi

Heartbreak: Sarah Capewell with her daughter Jodi, five

Sarah Capewell
Jayden Capewell

Sarah Capewell is fighting for new guidelines on when infants should be given intensive care after her premature son Jayden (right) was refused treatment

Medics allegedly told her that they would have tried to save the baby if he had been born two days later, at 22 weeks.

In fact, the medical guidelines for Health Service hospitals state that babies should not be given intensive care if they are born at less than 23 weeks.

The guidance, drawn up by the Nuffield Council, is not compulsory but advises doctors that medical intervention for very premature children is not in the best interests of the baby, and is not ‘standard practice’.

James Paget Hospital in Norfolk refused to comment on the case but said it was not responsible for setting the guidelines relating to premature births.

A trust spokesman said: ‘Like other acute hospitals, we follow national guidance from the British Association of Perinatal Medicine regarding premature births.’

Miss Capewell, who has had five miscarriages, said the guidelines had robbed her son of a chance of life.

James Paget Hospital

Short life: Miss Capewell’s son Jayden died two hours after he was born at James Paget Hospital in Gorleston, Norfolk, in October 2008

She said: ‘When he was born, he put out his arms and legs and pushed himself over.

A midwife said he was breathing and had a strong heartbeat, and described him as a “little fighter”.

I kept asking for the doctors but the midwife said, “They won’t come and help, sweetie. Make the best of the time you have with him”.’

She cuddled her child and took precious photos of him, but he died in her arms less than two hours after his birth.

Miss Capewell, who has a five-year-old daughter Jodie, went into labour in October last year at 21 weeks and four days after suffering problems during her pregnancy.

She said she was told that because she had not reached 22 weeks, she was not allowed injections to try to stop the labour, or a steroid injection to help to strengthen her baby’s lungs.

Instead, doctors told her to treat the labour as a miscarriage, not a birth, and to expect her baby to be born with serious deformities or even to be still-born.

Jayden Capewell
Jayden Capewell

Treasured memories: Pictures of baby Jason’s feet and hands

She told how she begged one paediatrician, ‘You have got to help’, only for the man to respond: ‘No we don’t.’

As her contractions continued, a chaplain arrived at her bedside to discuss bereavement and planning a funeral, she claims.

She said: ‘I was sitting there, reading this leaflet about planning a funeral and thinking, this is my baby, he isn’t even born yet, let alone dead.’

After his death she even had to argue with hospital officials for her right to receive birth and death certificates, which meant she could give her son a proper funeral.

Justice for Jayden: His mother is campaigning to change the law

Justice for Jayden: His mother is campaigning to change the law

She was shocked to discover that another child, born in the U.S. at 21 weeks and six days into her mother’s pregnancy, had survived.

Amillia Taylor was born in Florida in 2006 and celebrated her second birthday last October. She is the youngest premature baby to survive.

Miss Capewell said: ‘I could not believe that one little girl, Amillia Taylor, is perfectly healthy after being born in Florida in 2006 at 21 weeks and six days.

‘Thousands of women have experienced this. The doctors say the babies won’t survive but how do they know if they are not giving them a chance?’

Miss Capewell has won the support of Labour MP Tony Wright, who has backed her call for a review of the medical guidelines. He said: ‘When a woman wants to give the best chance to her baby, they should surely be afforded that opportunity.’

What the medical guidelines say…

Guidance limiting care of the most premature babies provoked outrage when it was published three years ago.

Experts on medical ethics advised doctors not to resuscitate babies born before 23 weeks in the womb, stating that it was not in the child’s ‘best interests’.

The guidelines said: ‘If gestational age is certain and less than 23+0 (i.e at 22 weeks) it would be considered in the best interests of the baby, and standard practice, for resuscitation not to be carried out.’

Medical intervention would be given for a child born between 22 and 23 weeks only if the parents requested it and only after discussion about likely outcomes.

The rules were endorsed by the British Association of Perinatal Medicine and are followed by NHS hospitals.

The association said they were not meant to be a ‘set of instructions’, but doctors regard them as the best available advice on the treatment of premature babies.

More than 80,000 babies are born prematurely in Britain every year, and of those some 40,000 need to be treated in intensive care.

The NHS spends an estimated £1 billion a year on their care.

But while survival rates for those born after 24 weeks in the womb have risen significantly, the rates for those born earlier have barely changed, despite advances in medicine and technology.

Medical experts say babies born before 23 weeks are simply too under-developed to survive, and that to use aggressive treatment methods would only prolong their suffering, or inflict pain.

The guidelines were drawn up by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics after a two-year inquiry which took evidence from doctors, nurses and religious leaders.

But weeks before they were published in 2006, a child was born in the U.S. which proved a baby could survive at earlier than 22 weeks if it was given medical treatment.

Amillia Taylor was born in Florida on October 24, 2006, after just 21 weeks and six days in the womb. She celebrated her second birthday last year.

Doctors believed she was a week older and so gave her intensive care, but later admitted she would not have received treatment if they had known her true age.

Her birth also coincided with the debate in Britain over whether the abortion limit should be reduced.

Some argued that if a baby could survive at 22 weeks then the time limit on abortions should be reduced.

The argument, which was lost in Parliament, followed a cut to the time limit in 1990 when politicians reduced it from 28 weeks to 24 weeks, in line with scientific evidence that foetuses could survive outside the womb at a younger age.

However, experts say cases like Amillia Taylor’s are rare, and can raise false expectations about survival rates.

Studies show that only 1 per cent of babies born before 23 weeks survive, and many suffer serious disabilities.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1211950/Premature-baby-left-die-doctors-mother-gives-birth-just-days-22-week-care-limit.html#ixzz0QdMqsLwl